(Source: zay4ik)

dickjarvisblogblog:

bogleech:

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK
We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.
Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”
Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

Burton didn’t even have a TANGENTIAL connection to Coraline but because it was advertised as “from the director of Nightmare Before Christmas” and people think Burton directed Nightmare (or even wrote the script or did much of anything but visit the set off and on) they still equate Coraline with him.
The same thing happens to “9” because people don’t get what “produced by” means.

huh

dickjarvisblogblog:

bogleech:

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

image

Did you guess yet?

image

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

image

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

image

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

imageHave you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

image

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

Burton didn’t even have a TANGENTIAL connection to Coraline but because it was advertised as “from the director of Nightmare Before Christmas” and people think Burton directed Nightmare (or even wrote the script or did much of anything but visit the set off and on) they still equate Coraline with him.

The same thing happens to “9” because people don’t get what “produced by” means.

huh

Oldish portrait thing and a re-color hand-tweak on George!

(Source: catsbeaversandducks)

ya-ssui:

Don’t be scared. I’m a shapeshifter too!

ya-ssui:

Don’t be scared. I’m a shapeshifter too!

(Source: portavoz)

http://mr-mordin.tumblr.com/post/93370975369/human-culture-anomalously-diverse-many-different →

http://mr-mordin.tumblr.com/post/93370975369/human-culture-anomalously-diverse-many-different

mr-mordin:

Human culture anomalously diverse. Many different cultures alive, all with different morals. Not like Salarians. Almost all Salarians respect science. Rational mindsets common. Humans vary wildly. Some resemble Krogan mentally, possible examples include Jack, former companion. Others shaped by…

Hi Maya, I am writing to ask you what you know about the differences between Western and Eastern Russian culture. I would like to know if there are main differences in superstitions and religious practices? I am working on a comic based in Western Russia, and eventually I want to feature a character in the story who is an upir/black shaman from Buryatia. I want to know what sort of issues I should bear in mind, when he comes into the Western half of Russia (with an amur tiger!)


coelasquid:

mayeko:

EDIT: Tried to put the mass amounts of texts under a cut but my theme is balls so I’m just gonna put all this out there while I attempt to tinker with CSS.

PUBLISHING THIS SO ANYONE CAN JUMP IN AND OFFER MORE ACCURATE INFORMATION. I KNOW MY SIBERIBROS ARE OUT THERE AND I AM 16 YEARS REMOVED FROM THE MOTHERLAND SO ALL OF THIS IS FROM WHAT LITTLE MY FAMILY HAS TOLD ME AND HOURS SPENT ON WIKIPEDIA AND VARIOUS SMALL ONLINE RESOURCES. I AM NOT AN EXPERT. I REPEAT I AM NOT AN EXPERT. Also you’ll note some ~<{[=***contentious personal opinions***]}>~ but I’m having a pretty furious week so please allow me to indulge:

The Buryats ( = boor-yatt) are a separate tribe to my own, the Yakut ( = yah-koott) and much further south. I’m assuming they’re a lot more similar to the native Mongol populations just south of them. I’d recommend doing some reading on Tengriism for general mythology, but keep in mind that modern Tengriisim is a weird revived version of the original pagan oral tradition, which varied from tribe to tribe and religious diversity was something that was encouraged by Temujin (Genghis Khan).

As for black shamans, my Yakut ancestors were white shamans, so I know more of what the white half was up to, and even then it was pretty vague since it’s been kept rather hush hush for the last 400 years since the Christian missionaries came and converted everyone under threat of destruction. Black shamans and white shamans have pretty much the same skillset, they only differ in what they do with those skills. Black shamans hurt while white shamans heal. They can both commune with nature, talk to spirits/gods, have a mastery of herbalism and know all the best psychedelic plants and their preparation by heart. They can also shapeshift apparently so you may not need a tiger companion at all (also why would you do that, tigers are so hard to draw, SO MANY STRIPES OF GOD AND THEY HAVE TO BE CONSISTENT NOOOOOO). Oh and white shamans live with a community and are highly revered while black live in isolation and are shunned (because if you go see the black shaman it means you want to order a curse or something similarly anti-social in a small close knit village so DOOONT DOOO THAAAAT unless you want everyone giving you the side eye). They’re pretty much just classic fairy tale witches with hexes and curses and poisons and the like.

As for social differences… that depends on the time frame for this story? But in general the the two thirds of Russia east of the Ural mountains are:

A) Considered part of Asia
B) Given it’s own distinct region name: Siberia

From the above statements you can extrapolate that the Western, predominantly SLAVIC culture of Russia is quite distinct (although still fairly similar, after some 400 years of Russian rule) from the considerably more TURKIC and NORTHERN NOMAD tribes of Siberia. First of all there are still some nomadic tribes wandering around who herd caribou and ride either Siberian horses (Somewhat considered a subset of the Przewalski’s horse, they look like The Hobbit horses) or the caribou themselves (speaking of, fffffuuuuuck youuuuu fRozennn, Northern nomads are the same everywhere and Sven is NOT what an 1800’s northerner would have looked like, no matter what your focus groups freakin responded to, I am super tired of everyone being SHOCKED that the north and Siberia are filled with people who look “Asian” or “Inuit” like YO WE’VE BEEN HERE FOR TENS OF THOUSANDS OF YEARS WHAT THE FUCK GET ON OUR LEVEL PLANET EARTH). Second the religion is much more muddled and specific to each individual place/tribe/person/practitioner. Third there is a greater connection to nature simply due to the weather’s monumental role in every day life. People still hunt, and technology/tools can vary wildly from tribe to tribe.

For example my people were considered more “civilized” and possessing of secret magic because they put down roots on top of a load of precious metals, gems and high quality iron ore, and were able to hold our ground at this sweet spot by the river with our superior weapons. So basically a groups surroundings will dictate the society that takes form.

Also I’ve never heard of Upir in Russia ….they’re just called vampires in Russian. Literally. We say it “Vam-peer”. I’d never in my life heard the term Upir until I watched Hemlock Grove. Pretty sure McGreevy just plucked a name from European folklore to make it authentic/exotic to Americans.

Some info about Siberian shamanism from my Siberibro with a lot of family history involved in this sort of thing.

bumblebunn:

I always love when this pixel art pops up on my dash.

(Source: elosilla)

zereska:

Bodahn Feddic: Are you sure I can’t interest you in this hat?

Cole: Take all my money.

varric-is-my-spirit-guide:

I designed my Inquisitor, you guys.  She’s a smart, strong, sensual woman.

varric-is-my-spirit-guide:

I designed my Inquisitor, you guys.  She’s a smart, strong, sensual woman.

celestedoodles:

daria grownup -  Daria and Jane step out from Jane’s senior art show at Boston Fine Arts College to get a slice of pizza from a food truck

celestedoodles:

daria grownup -  Daria and Jane step out from Jane’s senior art show at Boston Fine Arts College to get a slice of pizza from a food truck

garpusstuff:

archiemcphee:

If you’re looking for an awesome rainy day or ‘It’s way too hot to go outside today’ activity, why not have a go at Barbie doll mummification? It’s all kinds of morbid, geeky fun. Heather and her daughter Izzy started with a trip to the library and some research to create an adorably macabre step-by-step “How to Make a Mummy” list. Then the gathered and/or made all the necessary materials. Barbie’s internal organs and ceremonial death mask are paper cutouts. They used a seam ripper in place of the special tool that ancient Egyptians used to pull the brain out through the nose and a shoebox for the sarcophagus and burial chamber. They also included a tiny toy kitty, because they were sacred to the Egyptians and sometimes part of the burial process.

Visit the Kids Activities Blog for additional photos and a complete description of the Barbie mummification process.

[via io9 and Kids Activities Blog]

Hey johnlockintensifies:  think the twins would be interested?

yellowfur:

sorry or not sorry

yellowfur:

sorry or not sorry

aowins:

The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies

Welp. Time to get back into Hobbit land.

theghostoflove
CREDIT